Career Development Education

Continuing Education Has More Benefits Than You May be Aware of

According to University of Phoenix, more than 54% of working adults have plans to return to college to further their education. While some of them go back for work related requirements, many of them see the various benefits in furthering their education. Going back to school is more than just a method for getting another degree under your belt. Ideally, continued education allows adults the increased opportunity to network, enhance their current abilities, learn new concepts, switch careers, and increase their potential for job advancements.

Job Mobility

Continued education can significantly open up new doors for career opportunities. Learning new concepts such as speaking a new language or learning to use various technologies can provide new responsibilities in the workplace. Some employers see the advantages in continued education and offer incentives including raises and financial assistance with the hopes of enticing current employees to enhance their capabilities. Even if your present employer doesn’t offer incentives for continued education, adding new skills and abilities to your resume can most certainly put you in the running for new opportunities as they become available.

Networking Opportunities

Going back to school also opens the doors to new networking possibilities. Adults who return to school are able to surround themselves with like-minded individuals. This allows them to make new connections and contacts within their respective fields of interest. Sometimes, working in the same environment for several years can stunt your social interactions, hindering you from learning new faces in the business. However, taking continued education courses helps individuals to expand their network and make connections with individuals from all walks of life. Such contacts become important when looking to conduct business, work on projects together, or even land a new job in the future.

Career Changes

It is not uncommon for adults to switch jobs several times in their careers. In fact, many adults end up changing fields altogether. Some of the factors behind this decision include needing higher pay, a decrease in job fulfillment, layoffs, or stress. If you’re thinking about switching careers altogether, then continued education is crucial. Unless you’re looking to enter the field at an entry level, continued education programs allow you to enhance your skills and knowledge in a particular field of study.

For example, if you were once a nurses aid but now wish to be a registered nurse, you have some of the core requirements, but lack the know-how to handle more extensive responsibilities. Attending certain programs might allow you to build on your current skills and abilities while learning new concepts to prepare you for the high demands a registered nurse deals with. The Valley Anesthesia site lists some potential courses as well as review guides related to continuing one’s education for for the CRNA.

Enrichment

One might assume that continued education is only a method for landing higher paid jobs; however, this is only part of the benefit. Concepts change as technology and sciences evolve. Continued education can be solely for the purpose of enlightening you in those areas. For example, taking a course or two in the information technology sector won’t lead to a degree, but can give you better insight into topics you enjoy. Individual classes can come in handy and they allow you to socialize with like-minded individuals.

Going back to school does not have to be something required by your employer for it to be beneficial to your life. As you can see, continued education can help adults in all areas of their profession. It opens the doors for new opportunities, allows you to network with people you may otherwise have never met, gives you the possibility to explore new career paths, and even enlightens you as trends of today change. So if you’re considering the possibility of going back to school, consider these benefits as you choose an educational program that works best for you.

This is a guest post from Becky Wilcox

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