Career Development

Pull Up Your Socks and Get Ready for a Bright Career

We’re young and we don’t have a care in the world. Right now, all we need is some good music and some good vibes, right? Our dream is to just be at peace—everything else comes after. All this would be in an ideal world. But when reality comes a knockin’, we realize that we have things to do. Like get a job, for instance. I’m pretty sure that during career counseling, we’ve all been told—this path is no good, there’s too much market saturation—even if it’s something you’ve dreamt of being since you were a child. But what if I told you that there were a few jobs out there that will not go out of business in the near future, and they need a skill set so specialized that not everyone can make the cut? It’s time to get a fresh look at what you can do with your life and I’ve got a couple of options that might pique your interest. Here they are:

1. Agriculture, actually

Don’t look so incredulous. A career in agriculture needs a very specific set of skills. And sure, everything on farms is getting mechanized but we still need humans to operate machinery. And it is a well-paying job. For instance, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistic, agricultural inspectors can earn an annual wage of around $46,000. And there are many more branches that you could look into. Because, think about it. Producing food is a necessity—there will always be jobs in this domain.

2. Veterinarians please

This one is touted as one of the fastest growing jobs in the United States. Did you know that in 2012, 62 per cent of households in America had at least one pet—cats, dogs, iguanas, parrots, all inclusive? That’s a really huge number of pets, and an equally huge number of possibly ailing pets that need urgent medical attention. That’s where you come in. And what’s your average annual wage like? A whopping $90,000 if you’re good at what you do. As cats become an even bigger internet sensation, you can expect a growth possibility in this field like no other.

Vet-job-pic

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source: http://www.bls.gov/ooh/images/2510.jpg

3. Counseling quotient

So you’re a step below psychologists and psychiatrists because all you have is a Master’s degree, but that is great for you because mental health counselors (or even marriage or family therapists) are hot in the job market. This job is growing at the rate of 29 per cent, much faster than average. If you choose this domain, your average salary would be around $40,000 annually and a surge in work-related pressures ensures that you will have a steady supply of customers, including schools and corporate firms who would like to keep their students and employees happy and give them a place to vent. In this situation, stress is a good thing, for you.

 

Mental-Health-Counselors

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source: http://www.bls.gov/ooh/images/2117.jpg

4. Medical assistance needed

An aging baby Boomer population has led to a sharp increase in the demand for medical attention. When you think medicines, usually what people pictured in their heads are doctors with their white coats and stethoscopes. But working behind the scenes are medical assistants whose job domain is growing at the rate of 29 per cent. An average annual wage of more than $30,000 a year and all you need is a special certificate after high school. It’s a great opportunity to help people and be one of the unsung pillars of the medical world.

There are many jobs out there that are growing at a faster than average rate because of the changing demands of this ever-changing world. All you need to do is understand where your interests lie and research about what is available in that area. Now would be a good time to pull up your socks and make your dreams come true!

Resources:

http://www.bls.gov/oes/CURRENT/oes452011.htm
http://www.americanhumane.org/assets/pdfs/pets-fact-sheet.pdf
http://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes291131.htm
http://www.yti.edu/programs/default.asp
http://www.bls.gov/ooh/community-and-social-service/mental-health-counselors-and-marriage-and-family-therapists.htm
http://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes319092.htm

This is a guest post from contributor, Ray Holder.

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